Dual Ball-1s-200px (1).gif
Interior of Book Store

E-BOOK DETAILS

6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png

Indian Shipping - A case study of the working of Imperialism

Mirza Firuz Shah

Contributed

Listen To E-Book Audio

Click To Listen Audio

Read E-Book Other Formats

Book Review

Subject:

History

Subclass:

Timured/Mughal

Subject Era:

Jahangir II 1920-1948

Author:

Asoka Mehta

Volume:

-

Edition:

-

Year:

1940

Publisher and Place:

N.T.Shroff, Bombay

Languages:

English

ISBN 10|13:

978-1178586190

Royal Mughal Ref:

ARC-1000001-2313

Description

India for centuries had been a sea-faring nation. Her ships sailed across the many seas. Her people colonised and civilised distant lands. We shall point only to a land-mark or two from the proud record of those achievements. After Alexander's invasion of India, a large part of his vast army returned homewards from the Punjab via the Indus and the Persian Gulf.
For the purpose of this famous voyage of Nearchus, Alexander's general, down the rivers and
the Persian Gulf all the available boats were impressed and a stupendous fleet was formed
numbering, according to the estimate of Ptolemy, nearly 2,000 vessels.

This river flotilla continued to expand during the succeeding centuries. In the reign of Akbar, according to the "Ain-e-Akbari," 40,000 vessels were engaged in the commerce of the Indus alone. In oceanic traffic and ship-building, ship India was second to none. Marco Polo has paid tributes to Indian shipping Corporation. The system of sheathing or multi-planking, eulogised by Marco Polo, was, nearly 500 years later, recommended to the East India Company by Gabriel Snodgrass as a novelty, evidently invented by himself. When Vasco da Garna first reached India he found some local seamen who knew more about navigation than he did. When he tried to impress them with his navigational instruments, they instantly produced their own, which he
found to be similar but obviously superior. Cessare Di Fedorici, a Venetian traveller, writing about 1565, stated that such was the abundance of materials for ship-building in India that the Sultan of Turkey found it cheaper to have his vessels built in Dacca than at Alexandria. And even as late as the Napoleonic Wars, Codrington, a British admiral, chose to go into action at Navarino in a flagship, Asia, that had come out of an Indian dockyard.

Rate This BookDon’t love itNot greatGoodGreatLove itRate This Book

Thank You for your reviews

Ratings & Review

Mohmedd shareef

Thank You for Suggestion and replaced image with proper one.

Mirza Firuz

This is not the same may be one of his great grand children ???

Ss Records

4.0

Rajasthan, Delhi and Agra are the jewels in India's crown. From fairy-tale palaces and epic forts to dizzying festivals and wildlife encounters, this is India at its unbeatable Bollywood best.