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Prince Khurram (later Shah Jahan) Weighed Against Metals

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December 31, 1606
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Mirza Firuz Shah
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People
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Jahangir 1605–1627

Prince Khurram (later Shah Jahan) Weighed Against Metals

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Jahangir described this episode, which took place in 1607. in his Memoirs: “On Friday . . . I came to the quarters of Khurram which had been made in the Urta Garden. In truth, the building is a delightful and well proportioned one. Whereas it was the rule of my father to have himself weighed twice every year, (once) according to the solar and (once according to the) lunar year, and to have the primes weighed according to the solar year, and moreover in this year, which was the commencement of my son Khurram ’s sixteenth lunar year, the astrologers and astronomers represented that a most important epoch according to his horoscope would occur, as the prince’s health had not been good, I gave an order that they should weigh him according to the prescribed rule, against gold, silver, and other metals, which should be divided among faqirs and the needy.’’ As so often in Mughal art, this miniature brings together the worlds of flesh and spirit. While the setting is packed with rich carpets, jewels, imported Chinese statuettes, and gem-studded weapons, the background opens into a visionary garden. The coins were then distributed to the needy. Prince Khurram is seated on a scale made of gold set with rubies and other jewels. Before him an oval and rectangular trays are knives and daggers, small gold jars, cups and saucers, all studded with jewels. To more trays have necklaces of precious gems. The official beside the prince is identified as Jahangir's Commander-in-Chief, Abd al-Rahim Khan-i Khanan. The memoires of Jahangir, also called the Tuzuk-i Jahangiri, were illustrated by the emperor's favourite artists. Jahangir weighing Prince Khurram (Shah Jahan) against gold and silver From a dispersed Jahangirnama Mughal India, c. 1615 Opaque watercolour and gold on paper The memoirs of Jahangir, also called the Tuzuk-i Jahangiri, were illustrated by the emperor's favourite artists; another painting from the manuscript by Abu'l Hasan is on view in Room 90. Jahangir weighing Prince Khurram (Shah Jahan) against gold and silver Emperor Jahangir weighing his son Khurram against gold From a dispersed Tuzuk-i Jahangiri Attributed to Manohar Opaque watercolour, gold and ink on paper, Mughal India, about 1615 In 1607, when Prince Khurram, the future Shah Jahan, was 16 years old, his father ordered that he be weighed against gold, to be divided amongst the needy. Bequeathed by PC Manuk and Miss GM Coles through the National Art Collections Fund. Jahangir weighing prince Khurram (later Shah Jahan) in gold Gouache on paper Mughal India, about 1615 The official beside the prince is identifies as Jahangir's Commander-in-Chief, Abd al-Rahim Khan-i Khanan. The leaf is evidently from an album of illustrations prepared for the finished copy of Jahangir's memoirs, the Tuzuk-i Jahangiri. Jahangir weighing prince Khurram (later Shah Jahan) in gold Gouache on paper Mughal India, about 1615 The official beside the prince is identified as Jahangir's Commander-in-Chief, Abd al-Rahim Khan-i Khanan. The leaf is evidently from an album of illustrations prepared for the finished copy of Jahangir's memoirs, the Tuzuk-i Jahangiri. To Read More Visit This Book Link https://www.mughallibrary.com/ebooks2020/Imperial-Mughal-Painting 


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Ismail Mazari

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Very good information.

MUGHAL IMAGES

The Mughal Images immediately took a much greater interest in realistic portraiture than was typical of Persian miniatures. Animals and plants were the main subject of many miniatures for albums and were more realistically depicted. To upload your images click here.

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