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Advertising to your predecires Letter No.1898 Dated 13th June last Regarding Mirza Ilahi Bukhsh. File No.3

Advertising to your predecires Letter No.1898 Dated 13th June last Regarding Mirza Ilahi Bukhsh. File No.3

Pension

MARC-15092022-004

March 15, 2023 at 5:39:41 AM

Delhi State Archives

Pension of Mirza Ilahi Baksh File No.3

September 8, 1859

September 15, 2022 at 8:00:00 PM

English

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                                                                            CHAPTER X IX.

                           DEATH OF THE HEIR-APPARENT OP DELHI AHD

                                     QUESTION OF A SUCCESSOR, 1866-57.

 

1,From Simon Fraser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant- Governor,Forfh-Western Provinces, Eehlee, to C. B- Thornhill, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North- Western Provinces, Agra,—No. 59, dated Eehlee, 11th July 1856,
 
I HAVE the honor to report, for the information of theHon’hle the Lieutenant-Governor, the unexpected demise yesterday at 7 p. m. of His Royal Highness the Prince Mirza Mohummud Sultan Futteh-ool-Moolk Shah, Bahadoor, Heir-Apparent of Delhi, and to annex extract from the of Palace Intelligence, from which it will be observed that cholera was the immediate cause of death.
 
2. I have received no communication as yet from HisMajesty on the subject, and shall suspend all observations and suggestions for a day or two in order to afford an opportunity to all parties interested to express their views and expectations, and afterwards I shall again have the honor
to address you in connection with this subject.

 
8. A list of the King's surviving sons is annexed.
 
2. Extract from Precis of Palace Intelligence.Thursday, 10th.—His Majesty proceeded to the Summun Boorj. Hussun Uskuree, Peerzadah, attended and breathed a blessing on His Majesty. It was represented that during the night the Heir-Apparent had four evacuations contrary to habit, and having felt hungry the Prince imagined that an empty stomach promoted bile and partook of some bread with curry gravy,when  Immediately the evacuations increased, amounting to eleven in number, which produced great debility. Every remedy to afford relief proved ineffectual, and His Royal Highness rapidly sunk. Mirza Elahee Buksh sent for Hukeem Ahsunoollah Khan to prescribe. The Hukeem recommended a clyster and proceeded to report matters to His JMajesty, and took his leave. His Majesty retired to rest and in the afternoon performed his devotions. The Nawab Zeenut Mahul Begum waited on the King. At about 6 o'clock Hukeem Ahsunoollah Khan arrived and represented that he had himself administered the clyster to the Prince, which, however, did no good, and that the Heir-Apparent was then in a moribund state, and immediately after the noise of lamentation was heard in the direction of the Heir-Apparent residence and news was brought of His Royal Highness' demise. His Majesty expressed his sorrow. The Nawab Zeenut Mahul Begum condoled with His Majesty; Orders were given to make the necessary preparation for the Prince's interment, and His IMajesty sent a message to the Agent for the issue of orders at the Delhiand Ajmere Gates of the city to pass parties proceeding by either of the above gates to ])repare the grave for the Prince, and also to arrange with the Brigadier Commanding the station for the firing of 40 minute guns, corresponding with the age of His Royal Highness (40 years).

 
                                                                                      S. FRASER,
                                                                      Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,
                                                                        North-Western Provinces.



 
                                 DEATH OF THE HEIR-APPARENT, 1856
                                                 Enclosure (2) to 1.

 
[ Vide  enclosure of late Agent’s Report, No. 7 of 1849, dated 19th February 1849.]
 
3. List of His Majesty*s surviving sons in the order of seniority.













 
S.NO
                  —----------------
Mother
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12






 
Mirza Koeaab Shekoh, illegitimate
 
Ubool Huasun,
 
Mohammed Zuheer, alias Mirza Moghul legitimate
 
Sohrab-in-e-Hindee, illegitimate
 
Uboo Nusr,
 
Ulugh Tabur,
 
Kbizur Sooltan,
 
Juwan Bukht, legitimate
 
Bukhtawur Shah, illegitimate
 
Kochuk Sooltan, illegitimate
 
Shab Ubbas Mirza,
 
Mohumud Sher Shah,
 
Motce Baee.
 
Khynm Baee
 
Shurufut Mahul Begum,
 
Doulat Qudum..
 
Motee Baee {vide No. 1).
 
Ufznlool Nissa Kbanum
 
Ruheem Buksh Baee..
 
The Nawab Zeenat Mahul
Begum.
Rajun Khawas.
 
}Unknown.
 
 
 



 
Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,
NorthWestern Provinces,



 
4. From the Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces,to G. F- EoMOSSTOirs, Esquire, Secretary to the Government of  India,Foreign Department  No–965 A dated Nynee Taal,16th July 1856.

 
I am  desired to  transmit to you  for submission to the Right Hon’ble the Governor-General in Council, the accom- panying copy of a letter from the Agent at Dehlee, No. 59of the 11th instant, with its enclosures, reporting the death, on the 10th instant, of His Royal Highness the Heir-Apparentof Delhi.
 
2. A further communication will be made by theLieutenant-Governor on the receipt of the promised report from the Agent.
 
5. From Simon Fejser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,North-Western Provinces, Eehlee, to 0. B. THORNHILl,Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North-western provinces,Agra,-No 60 Dated Delhi 14th July 1856

 
In continuation of letter No: 59 of the 11 instant reporting the demise of the late Heir-Apparent of Delhi, I have now the honor to state, for the information ofGovernment, that I waited upon His Majesty this morning to pay him the usual visit of condolence, and during the interview His Majesty placed in my hands a letter and its enclosure, of which translations accompany, and intimated that they conveyed the expression of his wishes on the present occasion, and he was anxious I should exert myself in favor of the succession of his son Mirza Juwan Bukht.




 
2. "With reference to the views of the Government expressed on the occasion of the discussions previous to the recognition of the late Heir-Apparent, I consider the enclosed documents to call for no observations from me. The surviving sons of the King have no special marks of nobility, or peculiar recommendations, calculated to attract the sympathy of the  native population ; and advertising to the advanced age of His Majesty, I view the present reference as simply a last effort on the part of the favorite Begum to secure for her sonthe long-desired post of honor in the family
 
3. My own belief is that His Majesty is sensible the application must be unsuccc-ssful, and if left to himself would not press the matter upon notice at the present juncture,— indeed the fact that the Slooqa is addressed to me and not to higher authority clearly, to my mind, establishes this conclusion.
 
4. But, as the enclosed deed, renouncing, in favor of Mirza Juwan Bukht, all claim to be recognized as Heir-Apparent, is signed by nine of the eleven sons of His Majesty
(Mirza Koeash Shekoh and Mirza Juwan Bukht being the only names wanting), any further representation in respect to the succession is not to be expected, and the question
the issue may be at once brought under the consideration of the Hon'ble the Lieutenant-Government 
 
  In the event of the  King’s demise, or other contin- gency, rendering it                        necessary for mo to act before I receive definite instructions, I may here mention I shall act in conformity with the orders contained in the latter part of the 18tb paragraph of the instructions of the Governor-General, No. 7'Z of the 30th
November 1S51, of which, for the convenience of reference, a margin.
 
6. The points requiring immediate attention are
1st  , whether, in the present eireumstanccs of thefamily, the nomination of an Heir-Apparent, or the recognition of a successor to His Majesty, is at present called for ;
2nd  , whether, on the demise of Ills Majesty, the kingly title might not be discontinued ;
3rd if discontinued, who is to be recognized bead of the family, under what designation, and with what privileges ?

 
7. It appears to mo inexpedient to recognize any of the sons as Heir-Apparent. The Princes generally are not men successes of prominent influence, high personal character, qualifications or other recommendations. The discussions which took place with the late Heir-Apparent and their results are sufficiently known to have paved the way for the adoption of any steps Government may think politic or necessary. But little public
interest is felt in the fortunes of the family, and a favorable opportunity is presented, by the removal from the scene of the most respected member of the family, for the introduction of changes adapted to the altered condition of the family and the country, and recommended as conducive to the best interests of the parties directly concerned.
 
8. Entertaining these views, I would recommend that the question of succession be allowed at present to be at rest, but on His Majesty^s demise that Mirza Kocash Shekoh,
In virtue of primogeniture, be informed that Governmentis prepared to recognize him as the representative of the family (under limitations specified below) provided he consent to carry out the arrangements concerted with the late Heir-Apparent in all their bearings.
 
9. Much objection presents itself to reopening negotiation in respect to these arrangements with the fresh successor to His Majesty. They have been discussed and consented to under a less favorable aspect of affairs than at present supervenes, and I think it would be good policy to hold them definitively settled, and consent to them, expressive of a will- ingness to carry out the views and instructions of Government, a necessary preliminary to a formal recognition.
 
10. The question of the continuance or otherwise of the Kingly titles I am only partly in a position to discuss, as the records of the Agency are very defective, and I must therefore express my views with only a partial knowledge of the views of Government ; but it appears to be unnecessary for any object of justice or policy to uphold the anomaly of a Titular Sovereign without retainers, power or influence, and with privileges at any time liable to be curtailed.
 
11. If the title be discontinued, Mirza Koeasb Shekoh may be unobjectionable designated
Shahzadah  Sundur-e- Azeem-E Khan dan-E-Timoree”to which altered designation to the title and style of address, salute, &c., would require accommodations. The salute should not exceed 19 guns.
 
13. An assignment of Rs. 15,000 per mensem out of the Royal stipend would be an adequate allowance for the privy purse and personal expenses of the representative of the family, and the other members of the family would continue to draw their allowances direct from  the Treasury, subject to revision on the death of incumbents or a general
review of the claims of individuals.
 
13. A certain number of Nujeeb  and Sowars might be provided out of the Royal Pension fund, but this, and many other questions, such as the residence at the Qutub, the limits of the privileged jurisdiction of the head of the family, &c., may be loft for consideration as circumstances shall urge them on attention; and I do not anticipate difficulty if His Honor will allow me a broad discretion in carrying out the views of Government.
 
14. The representative of the British Government should be allowed a seat in his interviews with the head of the family.
 
6. From the Secretary to Government, Forth-Western provinces
to O. F. EDMONSTONE , Esquire, Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department, Fort William -No 996  A,, dated Nynee Tal, 21st July 1856.
 
 In continuation of my letter No. 965 A. of the 16th instant, communicating the demise of the late Heir-Apparent of Delhi, I am directed to submit the accompanying copy
of a letter from the Agent .at Delhi, No. 60, dated 14th current (received on the 19th), with its enclosures in original, and to state that the Lieutenant-Governor entirely concurs in the two suggestions of the Agent—the first, that no recognition is at this time required of an Heir-Apparent to the present King of Delhi and that, on the demise of the King liis eldest surviving son;Mirza Koeash Shekosh, should be regarded as the bead on£ the family, and established as such in an honorable position and with a liberal allowance,
but that the nominal and now unmeaning title of Sovereignty, with its inconvenient and unsuitable pretensions, should be discontinued.

 
No public respect attaches to any of the King’s sons, and there is nothing, as the Lieutenant-Governor believes, in the state of general feeling which renders it in any way
politics to maintain a Royal designation for the chief member of the family. The Lieutenant-Governor would indeed much regret if advantage were not taken of the favorable and easy opportunity now offered for introducing a change which, while
it is obviously fitting in the actual condition of the Indian Empire, and recommended by many considerations as regards the British Government, will, he is satisfied, be also for
the best interests of the Princes themselves. The abolition of the name and forms of Royal state will, it may reasonably be hoped, wean them the more readily from the habits of
idle, and too often vicious and discreditable frivolities, in which their lives have hitherto been wasted.
3. A copy of this letter has been this day communicated to the Agent, with directions, in the event of the sudden demise of the King, who is now in very advanced old age, to abstain from recognizing an Heir-Apparent, and to adopt only such measures as may be necessary for preserving the peace of the Palace, pending the receipt of the orders of the Right Hon’ble the Governor-General in Council. A copy of these orders may, the Lieutenant-Governor would suggest, be forwarded direct from your office to the Agent
for his guidance.
 
4. The return of the original enclosures is requested.

 
Copy forwarded to the Agent at Delhi in reply to his letter No. 60, dated I4th July, for information and guidance.
 
From Simon Fejser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,No7-th-Western Provinces, Dehlee, to 0. B. THORNHILL,Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces, Agra,—No. 62, dated Dehlee, 18th July 1856.
 
In continuation of my letter No. 60 of 14tli current, I have the honor to submit the accompanying' copy and translation of a communication to my address from Mirza
Mohummud Koeash respecting his pretensions to succeed to the office of Heir-Apparent, and to state that, having already entered into the question generally of succession, no particular observations appear called for in submitting the enclosures.
 
9. From the Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces,to G. F. Edmonstone, Esqtdre, Secretary to the Government  of India,Foreign Department No-1005 A dated Nynee Tal 23rd July 1856
 
In continuation of my letter to your address. No. 906 A. of the 21st instant, I am directed to transmit to you, for submission to the Right Hon'ble the Governor- General in Council, the accompanying copy of a letter from the Agent at Delhie, No. 62 of the 18th instant, with its enclosure in original, respecting the pretensions of Mirza Mohummud
Koeash, a son of the King of Delhie, succeeded to the office of Heir-Apparent.
 
2. The return of the original enclosures is requested.

 
10. From Simon Fraser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor, North-Western Provinces, Dehlee, to G. B. Thornhill, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North- Western Provinces, Agra,—No. 68, dated Dehlee, 9th August 1856.
 
In continuation of my letter No. 60, dated 14th ultimo, I have the honor to submit the accompanying translation of a communication to my address, of this days date, from 
Mirza.
 
Mohammad Koeash. in support of his claim to be recognized as Heir-Apparent in succession to the late  Mirza MobummudSooltan Futteb-ool-Moolk Shah.
 
2. A reply has been written acknowledging the receipt of the above and stating that his letter would be forwarded for the consideration and orders of the Hon'ble the Lieuten-
ant-Governor, and that he would be made acquainted with the result.

 
11. Translation of a letter from Mirza Moiixjmmub Koeesh, to the address of the Agent, Lieutenant-Governor, North-western provinces delhi dated 9th August 1856.
 
I formerly  addressed you in detail on the subject of myclaims to succeed to the olliee of Heir-Apparent, the contents of which communication you must have become aware of. Now, with my entire free will, without being intimidated by any party, I write this to state that whatever agreements were entered into by my late brother, Mirza Mohummud Sooltan Futteh-ool-iloolk Shah, Buhadoor, with the higher authorities I am willing with all my heart to ratify and confirm ; and also whatever may be desired by Government I shall be prepared to accede to, feeling confident that the higher authorities do not contemplate the extinction of this ancient dynasty, and as the British Government has always recognized and maintained the rights of both great and small, I request you will submit a report in this matter that I may obtain my rights. Gratify me with a reply to this.

 
12. From the Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces, to S. Fraser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,North-Western Provinces,—No, 1160 A., dated Nynee
Tal, 15th August 1856.


 
I Am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 6S of the 9th instant, with its enclosure, being the translation of a letter from Mirza IMohummud Koeash respecting  his claim to be recognized as Heir-Apparent.
 
2. In reply, I am desired to observe that the object of the letter -would appear to be still to claim the retention of the titular designation and forms of Royalty, and that the Lieutenant-Governor can issue no remarks or instructions on this communication pending the decision of the Governor-General in Council on the recommendation which has been
submitted on that subject.
 
3. A copy of your letter and of this reply will be at once forwarded to the Supreme Government.
 
13. From the Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces, to G. F. EDMONSTONE  Esquire, Secretary to the Government of India,Foreign Department
No-1161 A dated Nynee Tal 15 August 1856.
 
 In continuation of my letter No. 1005 A. of the 23rd ultimo, I am desired to transmit to you, for submission to the Right Hon'ble the Governor- General in Council, the accom- panying copy of a letter from the Agent to the Lieutenant- Governor at Delhi, and of its enclosure, being the translation of a letter from Mirza Mohummud Koeash respecting his claim to be recognized as the Heir-Apparent of the Kinsof Delhie.
 
14. From G. F. Edmonstone, Esquire, Secretary to the Govern- ment of India, Foreign Department, to the Officiating Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces,
No. 4550, dated Fort William, 29th August 1856.
 
.The Governor-General in Council has had under his consideration your three despatches of Letter dated 16th July 1836, No. 965 A. the dates and Nos. noted in the Letter dated 21st July . i 1856, No. 996 A. margin, relative to the succession to Letter dated 23rd July throne of Delhi, consequent on 1856, No. 1005 A. the demise of the late Heir-Apparent, Prince Mirza Fukrooddeen, and I am now directed in reply to communicate the following observations and orders of His Lordship in Council on this important question.




 
2. His Lordship in Council observes that the opinions of the Lieutenant-Governor and of his Agent at Delhi are strongly opposed to the acknowledgment by the Government of India of any successor to the Crown^ either now or hereafter.
3. At the present day His Lordship in Council is unable
to see any reason why the Government of India should not
refuse to give a new and solemn sanction to a sham which
answers no good purpose and which will soon cease to be
 
defensible upon the only ground on which such a fiction can be defended consistently with its own dignity and truth-
fulness,—a respect, namely, for the personal feelings, recollec-
tions and associations of the members of a fallen house. Nearly all the every day signs of authority which the native
 
mind associates with Royalty have, for State reasons, been
taken from the Crown of Delhi. The presents which were
at one time offered to the King by the Governor- General and
by the Commander-in-Chief have been discontinued; the
privilege of a coinage carrying his mark is now denied to him.
The Governor-GeneraFs seal no longer bears a device of
vassalage, and even the Native Chiefs have been prohibited
from using one. It has been determined that these appear- ances of subordination and deference could not be kept up
consistently with a due respect for the real and solid power of the British Government, and the same may be said of the
title of King of Delhi, with the fiction of paramount sov- ereignty which attaches to it.
 
4. In this matter His Lordship in Council is bound by no treaty or engagement whatever. The munificent provision which has hitherto been made for the King and his family is due to the wise liberality of the British Government it has been continued on its present scale for six-and-forty years, and whatever may be the position assigned to the future head of the house, it would be neither politic nor generous to curtail it at present. But to recognize the title of King and a claim to the external marks of Royalty in a new person would be an act purely voluntary on the part of the Government of India and quite uncalled for. Moreover, it would not be accepted as a grace or favor by any but the individual himself. Now, as on the last occasion of the death of an Heir-Apparent, the request of the King is that Prince.
 
Mirza Jewan Buklit should be declared to be bis successor, on the grounds of legitimacy and alleged good qualities, and this request is supported by nine of the ten brothers of the
Prince. But it is inadmissible by Mahomedan Lair, and it is contrary to the principle laid down by the Government of India on the occasion referred to. Whatever be the degree of rank inherited, the Heir, whom in right and consistency the Government must recognise, is the eldest surviving son of the King, Prince Mirza Mahomed Koeash. His elevation, however, is not asked by any of his family, and, although he has pressed his own pretensions in a letter to the Lieutenant-Governor’s Agent in Delhi, it does not appear that he is, as his
 
The late brother was said to be peculiarly worthy of being selected for a post of distinction. He is described with the rest as having no prominent influence, high personal character, qualifications or other recommendations ; and, as he was born long after his family had become pensioners of the British Government, he has no claims from early reminiscences to see the unreal dignity of his house sustained for another generation in his own person. If other arguments were wanted, it may be found in the fact that the last few years have seen not only an extension, but a remarkable consolidation of the British power in India ; its supremacy has become more uniform and unbroken even within the earlier limits of the Empire ; and the preservation of a Titular King paramount of Hindostan has thereby grown to be a greater anomaly than ever. Lastly, there is every appearance that the presence of a Royal House in Delhi has become a matter of indifference even to the Mahomedans.
 
5. The discussions which took place with the late Heir-Apparent have, in the opinion of the Lieutenant-Governor’s Agent on the spot, prepared the way for any course which the Government may think proper to take; and even the King, in communicating his request for the recognition of his favorite son upon this occasion to the Agent, instead of addressing himself as formerly to the head of the Government,seems to admit that he has little hope that, in any case, his own wish will be compiled with 6. Under these circumstances the Governor-General in Council is of opinion that, until the sentiments of the Honorable Court upon the present occasion can he made known to the Government of India, nothing should be done which might commit the Government to a recognition of that title in the future head of the family ; and that if the King's death should occur before the orders of the Honorable Court have been received, and a final decision should be thereby forced upon the Government, that decision should be against any such recognition,
 
7. In this view His Lordship in Council desires that the Agent of delhi.instructed to the following effect:-
 
That, if in his judgment it should be necessary to answer the letter addressed to him by the King, the reply should be that the Governor-General in Council cannot consent to Recognize prince Mirza jawan Bukht as Heir-Apparent.
 
That no encouragement be given to Prince Mirza Mahomed Koeash to expect that his recognition will take place upon precisely the same conditions as that of his late brother, and that during the King's life no further communication be made to His Majesty or to any other person regarding the succession.
 
That, if the King should die, or if his death should appear to be at hand. Prince Mirza Mahomed Koeash be at once informed, in order to avoid a state of suspense and embarrassment, that the Governor-General in Council recognizes him as the head of the family, upon the same conditions as those accorded to Prince Mirza Pukrooddeen, excepting that, instead of the title of King and the external signs of Royalty, he
shall have the designation and position of Prince or Shahzadah of the House of Timour, and that this communication is to be made, not in the way of inviting negotiation or bargaining, which it is not the intention of the Governor-General in Council to admit, but as the declaration of the mature and fixed determination of the Government of India.
 
8. The details in regard to salutes, the reception of the representatives of the Government, the limit to be put upon privileged residents in the Palace of the future Prince, &c., will, I am desired to say, be adjusted after the first principal condition of the Governor-General in Council has been declared.
 
9. Upon the last point, however, viz., the number of the privileged residents, the Agent should be desired to report to how many the privilege would extend if the sons and
grandsons, but no more distant relatives, of any former King were admitted to it. In the opinion of the late Mr. Thomason this was a more reasonable limit than that which would have confined it to the sons and grandsons of the actual head of the house, and the question deserves examination.
10. In respect of the share of the family stipend which should be assigned to the Prince personally after the King’s death. His Lordship in Council is of opinion that Rs. 15,000 A month should suffice and he is accordingly pleased to fix that amount as the future of assignment of the representative of the family.
 
1 1. It is probable that difficulties will arise in dealing with the claims, just and unjust, of the great body of the Sullafeeit who, upon the King’s death, will, under any arrangement, be called upon to quit the Palace of Delhi. His Lordship in Council, therefore, requests that the Lieutenant- Governor will be good enough to direct his Agent’s attention to this point, in order that, without entering into a minute investigation of the claims, which at present is not desirable, the means of coming to an early decision upon the question, when the proper time arrives, may be at hand.
 
15. From the Secretary to the Government, North Western Provinces, to S. Fraser, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,Delhi, —So. 1361 A., dated Nynee Tal, 12th September 1856.
 
In continuation of my letter to your address. No. 997 A.of 21st July last, I am directed to transmit to you the accompanying copy of a letter from the Secretary, Government
out India, Foreign Department, No. 4550 of the 29th ultimo, on question of a the question of the succession to the throne of Delhie, and successor, request your strict  and careful attention to the orders intimated in paragraph 7 to 11 thereof.
 
2. The report called for in paragraph 9 will be furnished by you at your earliest convenience.
 
3. The Lieutenant-Governor will be prepared to consider, and to give instructions on any suggestions or enquiries which may occur to you in order to the more prompt and easy
execution of the present directions from the Supreme Govern-ment.
 
16. From Simon Fraser , Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,Forth-Western Provinces, dehlee, to 0. B. THORNHILLEsquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North- Western Provinces, Agra,—No. 75, dated Eehlee, 19th September 1856.
I HAVE the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 1304 A., dated 12th instant, with enclosure, from  the Secretary to Government of India, in the Foreign
Department, and, with reference to the 1st clause of paragraph 7 of the latter, to state, for the information of the Hon'’ble the Lieutenant-Governor, that having from the commence- ment led the King's Wakeel to understand the question of succession would be referred for the orders of the Home authorities, I do not purpose making any communication on the subject to His Majesty until the receipt of final orders. In tlio meantime, if pressed for a reply, I shall avoid any more direct answer, as intimation of the rejection of Mirza Juwan Buklit’s pretensions will only be productive of protracted and unprofitable discussion with His Majesty.
 
2. Respecting the other points, I beg to state that my enquiries have been directed for some time past to securing the best information, and I have every reason to hope that
When the time arrives all the necessary will be done satisfactorily an Expeditiously.
 
3. The report called for in your 2nd paragraph regarding “ the number of privileged residents  I beg to add, will be furnished as soon as I have obtained accurate and full
Particulars.

 
4. In connection -with the present stage of proceedings, the position of Mirza Koeash is the only embarrassing point. He draws an allowance of Rs. 100 per mensem from His
Majesty, and a more suitable provision would be desirable in his altered position, but to increase his allowance would be to recognize his claims, which at present would be inconvenient and unless therefore, the Prince urgently press his expectations on attention, I purpose endeavoring to stave off all discussion on this subject until the receipt of the orders of the Hon’ble the Court of Directors, when I would suggest a more liberal
Arrangement for his convenience and comfort.

 
17. From 0. B. THORNHILLL, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces, to S. FRASER, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor, Delhie,—No. 1436 A., dated 24th September 1856.



 
I AM directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter No. 75 of the 19th instant, communicating for information, With reference to paragraph 7 of Officiating Secretary of the Supreme GoA'ernment, No. 4050, dated 29th August, your intentions relative to the pretensions of Mirza Juwan Bukht should the question of succession be pressed by the King.
 
2. In reply, I am desired to intimate that the Lieutenant-Governor thinks that if the King should press you (which is not, however, probable) for an explicit statement of the opinion and intention of the Governor-General in Council in regard to the pretensions of Mirza Juwan Bukht, you should reply without reserve that the decision on the subject is consistent with that which has, on former occasions, been announced to His majesty. No needlessly painful communication should be made, but there can be no room for discussion, and if an answer is demanded from you, it should be direct and clear in its import,though expressed with all proper courtesy.

 
.It may be proper hereafter to give some suitable increase to the allowance of Mirza Koeash, but it will be desirable to defer this, if possible, till the receipt of final orders from the Home authorities.
 
4. A copy of your letter, and of this reply, will be sent to be laid before the Government of India.
 
From G. E. Thornuill, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces, to G. F, Edmonton .VE, Esquire, Secretary to Government of India, —
No, 1437 A., dated Nynee Tal, 24th September 1856,
 
I AM desired to transmit to you, for submission to the Right Honble the Governor-General in Council, the accom- panying letter from the Agent to the Lieutenant-Governor at Delbie, No. 75 of the 19tb instant, and of the reply thereto
of this date, communicating his intentions in regard to the pretensions of Mirza Juwan Bukht, should the question of succession to the office of Heir-Apparent be pressed by the
King.

19. From G. F. Edmonston, Esquire, Secretary to the Govern- ment of India, to G. B. Thornhill, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North-Western Provinces,—
No. 5191, dated Fort William, 15th October 1856.
 
I n reply to your letter dated the 24th ultimo. No. 14.37 A.,forwarding a copy of correspondence with the Agent at Delhie relative to his intentions in regard to the pretensions of Mirza Jewan Bukht, should the question of succession to the office of Heir-Apparent be pressed by the King, I am directed to acquaint you that the Governor-General in Council considers the orders of the Lieutenant-Governor on the subject to be judicious, and approves of them.
 
20. From SiMoy Fbaseh, Esquire, Agent, Lieutenant-Governor,North’ Western Provinces, Eehlee, to 0. B. Thornhill, Esquire, Officiating Secretary to Government, North- West-
ern Provinces, Agra, —No. 81, dated Dehlee, 17th October
 
With advertence to the 2nd paragraph of your letter No. 1361) A., under date the 12th ultimo, I have the honor to submit a memorandum exhibiting the number, at this date, of the lineal descendants of the Kings of Dehlee referred to in the 9th paragraph of the orders of the Supreme Government, No. 4550, dated 20th August last.
 
2. I have every reason to depend on the accuracy of this return.
 
Enclosure to (20).
 
Memorandum of the Lineal Descendants of the Kings Of Delhi
 
22' From the Secretary to Government, Forth-Western Provinces, to the Secretary to the Government of India, Foreign Department,—No. 1705 A., dated Nynee Tal, Sth Novem-
ber 1856.
 
With reference to paragraph 9 of the Orders No. lobO of the 29th of August. I am directed by the Hon’ble the Lieutenant-Governor to forward to you, for submission to the Right Hon’ble the Governor-General in Council, the accompanying copy of a letter No. 81, dated 17 th ultimo, from Mr. S. Fraser,the Agent at Delhi, and of its enclosure, being a Memo, of the Lineal Descendants of the King of Delhi.
 
2. The Lieutenant-Governor observes that 98 of the whole number (255) of persons in the list already live without the Palace. The Agent has stated the number of daughters and grand-daughters of former heads of the family,as well as of sons and grandsons. The females, it is believed, marry exclusively within the family. But they may bo prop-
erly left out of the present calculation, as where they may have married sons and grandsons of heads of the family they will be classed as members of the households of their husbands.

 
•3. The number of sons and grandsons alone is 130. It is not specified how many of these now live within the Palace.
 
4. It is clear, however, that a good number have already quitted the Palace, and this must lessen any impression of hardship from not providing accommodation within it for all of them.
 
5.The Lieutenant-Governor would recommend that no right of general residence within the future Palace be declared in favor of such persons, but that a discretion be left to the
Agent to concede the indulgence to any son or grandson of a former King (together, of course, with his family) whose position or circumstances may, at the time of giving effect to the new arrangement, be such as to render denial a serious hardship.
 
6.A copy of this letter will be sent to the Agent, that he may add any remarks which he may think material. These,if any should be received, will be at once forwarded for sub- mission to His Lordship in Council.




 
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