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An East African King Receives Three Emissaries, from a Khamsa of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi

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December 31, 1449
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Cleveland Art
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People
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Abdal-Latif Mirza 1449–1450

An East African King Receives Three Emissaries, from a Khamsa of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi

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DESCRIPTION

An East African King Receives Three Emissaries, from a Khamsa of Amir Khusrau Dihlavi c. 1450 India, Sultanate period Gum tempera and ink on paper Overall: 28.6 x 21.6 cm (11 1/4 x 8 1/2 in.) John L. Severance Fund 1963.261 DESCRIPTION The text on this page discusses the wars between Morocco and Zang, a region of eastern Africa centered in present-day Ethiopia. In the painting the King of Zang meets three envoys. The dramatic gesture of the Zangi king, who stretches out one hand as he takes an enormous stride toward the envoys, identifies him as a powerful, assertive figure. This page is from the first known manuscript of a Persian literary text illustrated by an Indian artist, who had probably been trained in the Jain manuscript tradition. The figures are arranged on one plane in a straight line against a flat red background, typical of manuscript painting in India in the 1400s. PROVENANCE ?-1963 (Heeramaneck Galleries, New York, NY, sold to the Cleveland Museum of Art) 1963- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH CITATIONS Leach, Linda York. Indian Miniature Paintings and Drawings. Cleveland, OH: Cleveland Museum of Art in cooperation with Indiana University Press, 1986. Reproduced: cat. no. 6 EXHIBITION HISTORY Year in Review (1963). The Cleveland Museum of Art (organizer) (November 26, 1963-January 5, 1964).

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Ismail Mazari

average rating is null out of 5

Very good information.

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