top of page
Dual Ball-1s-200px (1).gif
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
WRITINGS on the Indian Mutiny by ordinary British men and women differ significantly from the official reports of it commissioned by the British government and from later accounts written by historians. They include casual notes taken during the events and later expanded into a volume for the perusal of friends and relatives back home, private letters written on the spot, daily entries into diaries and journals kept for the purpose, reminiscences and recollections, and impressions provoked by a return to the scenes of war. Thus the descriptions are varied, heterogeneous, plentiful and fall very much within the tradition of non-fictional narratives by the British in India going back a hundred years and more. They depict both the excitement of fresh encounters with the East and the hardships of living in a hot country where Europeans were susceptible to all kinds of diseases previously unknown to them. Eliza Fay's Original Letters from India' is a good example of this genre of writing, where the form of the letter and the journal is used to unfold a personal narrative. Though such letter journals continued to be written during the entire period of British presence in India, they are progressively supplemented in large numbers by other kinds of writings, ranging from personal narratives like diaries, memoirs, and reminiscences, to formal literary texts like poems and novels. Early texts abound in picturesque descriptions and rich documentation of Indian life and character. In them, a search for the picturesque coexists with revelations of life in the zenana (women's quarters) and with 'random sketches ... interspersed with legends and traditions'? Most of these accounts begin with a description of the almost legendary voyage from England to India that marked the transition from a known world to an unknown one. Landing at the port of Madras, or Bombay, or Calcutta, most of them were impressed by the `...Asiatic splendour, combined
BESIEGED IN COMMON Shared Narratives of British Men and Women in 1857

BESIEGED IN COMMON Shared Narratives of British Men and Women in 1857

gold-medal-vector-816269.png

Contributed

Ira Bhattacharya

Read E-Book Other Formats

Read With Search Inside

Book Review

Subject:

Military Science

Subclass:

Military administration

Reign:

Bahadur Shah II 1837–1857

Subject Year (Time):

1857

Author:

Ira Bhattacharya

Languages:

English

Royal Mughal Ref:

ARC-07062021-1010

Date of Creation:

BESIEGED IN COMMON Shared Narratives of British Men and Women in 1857
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png

Description

WRITINGS on the Indian Mutiny by ordinary British men and women differ significantly from the official reports of it commissioned by the British government and from later accounts written by historians. They include casual notes taken during the events and later expanded into a volume for the perusal of friends and relatives back home, private letters written on the spot, daily entries into diaries and journals kept for the purpose, reminiscences and recollections, and impressions provoked by a return to the scenes of war. Thus the descriptions are varied, heterogeneous, plentiful and fall very much within the tradition of non-fictional narratives by the British in India going back a hundred years and more. They depict both the excitement of fresh encounters with the East and the hardships of living in a hot country where Europeans were susceptible to all kinds of diseases previously unknown to them. Eliza Fay's Original Letters from India' is a good example of this genre of writing, where the form of the letter and the journal is used to unfold a personal narrative. Though such letter journals continued to be written during the entire period of British presence in India, they are progressively supplemented in large numbers by other kinds of writings, ranging from personal narratives like diaries, memoirs, and reminiscences, to formal literary texts like poems and novels. Early texts abound in picturesque descriptions and rich documentation of Indian life and character. In them, a search for the picturesque coexists with revelations of life in the zenana (women's quarters) and with 'random sketches ... interspersed with legends and traditions'? Most of these accounts begin with a description of the almost legendary voyage from England to India that marked the transition from a known world to an unknown one. Landing at the port of Madras, or Bombay, or Calcutta, most of them were impressed by the `...Asiatic splendour, combined

Rate This BookDon’t love itNot greatGoodGreatLove itRate This Book

Your content has been submitted

Post Comment
Ratings & Review
Click To Close Comment Box
Click To Post Your Comment
Show Reviews

average rating is 5 out of 5

Ismail Mazari

average rating is null out of 5

Very good information.

average rating is null out of 5

Shah Sharaf Barlas

Comment

MUGHAL RESEARCH PAPERS

The Mughal Research Paper's biggest challenge was the research being held or paper published as Plagiarism. It is a major concern in the area of research which results in the poor quality of research. Mughal Library is the best solution for uploading your own paper & getting recognition. For uploading your paper click here.

The Mughal Library brings readers of our history and related subjects on one platform. our goal is to share knowledge between researchers and students in a friendly environment.

bottom of page