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Relations of the Ottoman Empire with the Indian Rulers 1750-1924
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The Ottoman Empire and the Indian subcontinent had limited direct contact throughout history, but there were some notable relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during the period of 1750 to 1924.

During the 18th century, the Ottoman Empire established trade relations with the Indian subcontinent through its ports. The Indian merchants traded spices, textiles, and other goods in exchange for Turkish coffee, ceramics, and other luxury items. In addition to this, there were also some diplomatic relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during this period.

One of the notable Indian rulers who had relations with the Ottoman Empire was Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore in southern India. Tipu Sultan was a strong ally of the Ottoman Empire and maintained correspondence with the Ottoman Sultan, seeking assistance in his fight against the British. Tipu Sultan also established trade relations with the Ottoman Empire and imported weapons and technology from them.

Another Indian ruler who had relations with the Ottoman Empire was the Nizam of Hyderabad. The Nizam maintained a close relationship with the Ottoman Empire and sent gifts to the Ottoman Sultan as a sign of goodwill. The Ottoman Empire also provided military assistance to the Nizam in his battles against the Maratha Empire.

In 1857, during the Indian Rebellion against the British East India Company, the Ottoman Empire expressed support for the Indian rebels. The Ottoman Sultan Abdulmecid I sent a letter to Queen Victoria expressing his sympathy for the Indian people and condemning the British actions in India.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire established the "Caliphate Committee" to garner support from Muslims around the world, including India. The committee aimed to portray the Ottoman Sultan as the leader of the global Muslim community and gain support for the Ottoman war effort. However, this effort did not gain significant traction in India, as Indian Muslims were divided in their loyalties.

Overall, while there were some limited relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during the period of 1750-1924, these were primarily based on trade and diplomacy rather than any deep political or military alliances.

Relations of the Ottoman Empire with the Indian Rulers 1750-1924

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SHAMSHAD ALI

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Subject:

General Works

Subclass:

Reign:

Shah Alam II 1759–1806

Subject Year (Time):

1750

Author:

SHAMSHAD ALI

Languages:

English

Royal Mughal Ref:

ARC-26042023-1002

Date of Creation:

April 25, 2023

Relations of the Ottoman Empire with the Indian Rulers 1750-1924
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Description

The Ottoman Empire and the Indian subcontinent had limited direct contact throughout history, but there were some notable relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during the period of 1750 to 1924.

During the 18th century, the Ottoman Empire established trade relations with the Indian subcontinent through its ports. The Indian merchants traded spices, textiles, and other goods in exchange for Turkish coffee, ceramics, and other luxury items. In addition to this, there were also some diplomatic relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during this period.

One of the notable Indian rulers who had relations with the Ottoman Empire was Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore in southern India. Tipu Sultan was a strong ally of the Ottoman Empire and maintained correspondence with the Ottoman Sultan, seeking assistance in his fight against the British. Tipu Sultan also established trade relations with the Ottoman Empire and imported weapons and technology from them.

Another Indian ruler who had relations with the Ottoman Empire was the Nizam of Hyderabad. The Nizam maintained a close relationship with the Ottoman Empire and sent gifts to the Ottoman Sultan as a sign of goodwill. The Ottoman Empire also provided military assistance to the Nizam in his battles against the Maratha Empire.

In 1857, during the Indian Rebellion against the British East India Company, the Ottoman Empire expressed support for the Indian rebels. The Ottoman Sultan Abdulmecid I sent a letter to Queen Victoria expressing his sympathy for the Indian people and condemning the British actions in India.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire established the "Caliphate Committee" to garner support from Muslims around the world, including India. The committee aimed to portray the Ottoman Sultan as the leader of the global Muslim community and gain support for the Ottoman war effort. However, this effort did not gain significant traction in India, as Indian Muslims were divided in their loyalties.

Overall, while there were some limited relations between the Ottoman Empire and Indian rulers during the period of 1750-1924, these were primarily based on trade and diplomacy rather than any deep political or military alliances.

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Ismail Mazari

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Very good information.

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Shah Sharaf Barlas

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Hello,
If possible anyone have shijra family tree of Mughal Barlas traib of Attock Pakistan please share with me.
Regards.

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