top of page
Dual Ball-1s-200px (1).gif
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
In the preface to his Bengali-English dictionary of 1834, the Calcutta entrepreneur and litterateur Ramkamal Sen related the following anecdote. In the seventeenth century, an English East India Company ship proceeded from the Bay of Bengal up the Hooghly River, before anchoring near the future site of the city of Calcutta. The vessel’s commander sent ashore to the leading local businessmen, and requested the assistance of a “dubash.” This word, in the environs of the Company’s southern entrepot of Madras, referred to a mediator, often a power-broker (literally, “one with two languages”). In riverine Bengal, however, where the Company was still a newcomer, the utterance more readily called to mind a dhoba, or washerman. Thus, the local magnates appointed such a man to tender his services to the foreign merchants. The dhoba timidly approached the Indiaman in a dinghy, bearing the customary gifts of “plantains, pumplemusses and sugarcandy,” or the like. To his pleasant bewilderment, he was received on deck with a salute, and presented not with bags of soiled laundry, but “with bags of gold and other precious articles.” Thenceforth, the dhoba was employed as “one of the principal native servants of the Company.” And over time, he acquired the learning and status he had been assumed to possess already. For Ramkamal, “He may be considered the first English scholar among the natives of Calcutta.
The East India Company and the Politics of Knowledge

The East India Company and the Politics of Knowledge

gold-medal-vector-816269.png

Contributed

Joshua Ehrlich

Read E-Book Other Formats

Read With Search Inside

Book Review

Subject:

Political Science

Subclass:

Political science (General)

Reign:

Humayun II 1858-1877

Subject Year (Time):

1858

Author:

Joshua Ehrlich

Languages:

English

Royal Mughal Ref:

ARC-17062021-1001

Date of Creation:

The East India Company and the Politics of Knowledge
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png
6.png

Description

In the preface to his Bengali-English dictionary of 1834, the Calcutta entrepreneur and litterateur Ramkamal Sen related the following anecdote. In the seventeenth century, an English East India Company ship proceeded from the Bay of Bengal up the Hooghly River, before anchoring near the future site of the city of Calcutta. The vessel’s commander sent ashore to the leading local businessmen, and requested the assistance of a “dubash.” This word, in the environs of the Company’s southern entrepot of Madras, referred to a mediator, often a power-broker (literally, “one with two languages”). In riverine Bengal, however, where the Company was still a newcomer, the utterance more readily called to mind a dhoba, or washerman. Thus, the local magnates appointed such a man to tender his services to the foreign merchants. The dhoba timidly approached the Indiaman in a dinghy, bearing the customary gifts of “plantains, pumplemusses and sugarcandy,” or the like. To his pleasant bewilderment, he was received on deck with a salute, and presented not with bags of soiled laundry, but “with bags of gold and other precious articles.” Thenceforth, the dhoba was employed as “one of the principal native servants of the Company.” And over time, he acquired the learning and status he had been assumed to possess already. For Ramkamal, “He may be considered the first English scholar among the natives of Calcutta.

Rate This BookDon’t love itNot greatGoodGreatLove itRate This Book

Your content has been submitted

Post Comment
Ratings & Review
Click To Close Comment Box
Click To Post Your Comment
Show Reviews

average rating is 5 out of 5

Ismail Mazari

average rating is null out of 5

Very good information.

average rating is null out of 5

Shah Sharaf Barlas

Comment

MUGHAL RESEARCH PAPERS

The Mughal Research Paper's biggest challenge was the research being held or paper published as Plagiarism. It is a major concern in the area of research which results in the poor quality of research. Mughal Library is the best solution for uploading your own paper & getting recognition. For uploading your paper click here.

The Mughal Library brings readers of our history and related subjects on one platform. our goal is to share knowledge between researchers and students in a friendly environment.

bottom of page